Ocular Disease

 

We provide diagnosis, treatment and management of diseases which affect the human eye and visual system.  Some examples include:

 

 

dry eye syndromeDry Eye Syndrome  
 

The tears your eyes produce are necessary for overall eye health and clear vision. Dry eye means that your eyes do not produce enough tears or that you produce tears which do not have the proper chemical composition. Often, dry eye is part of the natural aging process. It can also be caused by blinking or eyelid problems, medications like antihistamines, oral contraceptives and antidepressants, a dry climate, wind and dust, general health problems like arthritis or Sjogren’s syndrome and chemical or thermal burns to your eyes. 
   
If you have dry eye, your symptoms may include irritated, scratchy, dry, uncomfortable or red eyes, a burning sensation or feeling of something foreign in your eyes and blurred vision. Excessive dry eyes may damage eye tissue, scar your cornea (the front covering of your eyes) and impair vision and make contact lens wear difficult.
 
If you have symptoms of dry eye, see your optometrist for a comprehensive examination. Dry eye cannot be cured, but your optometrist can prescribe treatment so your eyes remain healthy and your vision is unaffected. Some treatments that your optometrist might prescribe include blinking more frequently, increasing humidity at home or work, using artificial tears, using an ointment or prescribing medication, like Restasis. In some cases, small plugs are inserted in the corner of the eyes to slow tear drainage.

 

   

Keratoconus is a disorder that occurs when the cornea, which is typically rounded, becomes cone-shaped.  The progression is usually slow and can stop at any stage from mild to severe.  This distortion increases as the cornea bulges and thins.  The apex of the cornea often scars, reducing the vision.  Treatment of Keratoconus is most effective with gas permeable contact lenses, designed specifically for the irregular corneal surface.  If contact lens treatment is not successful, surgical corneal transplant may be necessary.

 

 

diabetic retinopathy

  

Diabetic Retinopathy  is a condition when a diabetic persons blood sugar gets too high.  High blood sugar levels start a series of events which end in damaged blood vessel walls.  As such, the blood vessels begin to leak fluid or bleed, causing the retina to swell and form deposits know as exudates.  Vision can be lost if these spots are not watched and treated.  Here, at our office, we carefully examine the back of your eyes to follow and manage this and other important eye diseases.

 

 

 

Cataract is a clouding or opacity of the natural internal lens of the eye.  This opacity may be a small spot or may cover the entire lens.  When light enters the eye it is scattered, causing images to appear hazy and blurred.  There are many different types of cataracts.  The one shown here is a cortical cataract.  Here the opacity forms first is the periphery of the lens and develops inward, like spokes of a wheel.  Ultimately, the best  treatment is to remove the cataract lens and replace it with an acrylic man made lens.  This is referred to as cataract surgery.

 

 

macular degenerationMacular Degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in America. It results from changes to the macula, a portion of the retina that is responsible for clear, sharp vision and is located at the back of the eye.
 
Most people with macular degeneration have the dry form, for which there is no known treatment. The less common wet form may respond to laser procedures, if diagnosed and treated early.
 
Some common symptoms are a gradual loss of ability to see objects clearly, distorted vision, a gradual loss of color vision and a dark or empty area appearing in the center of vision. 
       
If you experience any of these, contact your doctor of optometry immediately for a comprehensive examination.
 
Central vision that is lost to macular degeneration cannot be restored. However, low vision devices such as telescopic and microscopic lenses can be prescribed to make the most out of remaining vision.
 
Recent research indicates certain vitamins and minerals may help prevent or slow the progression of macular degeneration. Ask your doctor of optometry about these. After age 60, an annual, comprehensive eye examination is an important to maintain eye health. 


 
Glaucoma
is an eye disease in which the internal pressure in your eyes increases enough to damage the nerve fibers in your optic nerve and cause vision loss. The increase in pressure happens when the passages that normally allow fluid in your eyes to drain become clogged or blocked. The reasons that the passages become blocked are not known.
 
Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness in the U.S. It most often occurs in people over age 40. People with a family history of glaucoma, African Americans, and those who are very nearsighted or diabetic are at a higher risk of developing the disease.
 
The most common type of glaucoma develops gradually and painlessly, without symptoms. A rarer type occurs rapidly and its symptoms may include blurred vision, loss of side vision, seeing colored rings around lights and pain or redness in the eyes.
 
Glaucoma cannot be prevented, but if diagnosed and treated early, it can be controlled. Vision lost to glaucoma cannot be restored. That is why the American Optometric Association recommends annual eye examinations for people at risk for glaucoma (your doctor may, depending on your condition, recommend more frequent examinations). A comprehensive optometric examination will include a tonometry test to measure the pressure in your eyes; an examination of the inside of your eyes and optic nerves; and a visual field test to check for changes in central and side vision.
 
The treatment for glaucoma includes prescription eye drops and medicines to lower the pressure in your eyes. In some cases, laser treatment or surgery may be necessary.


 

All staff are specialty trained doctors who have done extensive study into the mechanism of disease that affect the eye and their diagnosis and treatment. The Service is open six days a week and accepts major medical insurance as well as Medicare. We also provide an urgent care phone number that is accessible 24 hours a day.